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Art kids main Montana

Kids’ Arts Festival from the Perspective of a Docent

A circle of hands is how it felt for me, as I helped with KidWorks alongside the volunteers, my fellow docents and staff of the Holter Museum of Art. We needed everyone to make it work.
After this weekend, I have a visceral feeling for something else we docents get to do: help put together the most amazing festival — KidWorks! — a huge, wonderful day full of hands-on art activities for kids. Read on to find out what a docent REALLY does … and to see the magic that happens when over 800 participants come through our doors.

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diy crafts kids main

Hollyhock Dolls: a throwback to simpler times

I can’t remember if my grandmother or my mom taught me to make these hollyhock dolls, or maybe just told me about them. Anyway, I didn’t need to look up how to make them. I remembered they were made the hollyhock blossoms, a needle and thread. Some folks make them with toothpicks or stiff pine needles. For an old-fashioned nature craft on a relaxed summer day, this is the perfect way to have fun with your kids while making and reliving memories. They’re so easy!

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diy crafts kids main

Painted Critters and Things Made of Clay

If you have access to a kiln, or a friend who does, get a chunk of clay and make some of these cute little critters with your kids. We painted them instead of glazing them this time. Ema and Adia have some tips on making and painting little clay objects, based on their own experiences with this project. Thank you to Gene Hickman of the Helena Clay Arts Guild, for giving us the clay, and teaching the girls some tricks of the trade.

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diy crafts kids main

Kid’s Art: Root Creatures

Have you ever wanted to make an imaginary creatures? Here’s a DIY tutorial. All you need is a few driftwood roots and some paint. You can make whatever you can imagine when you look at the sticks.

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diy crafts kids main

Kid’s Art: Dribble and Blow Drawings

A fun kid-friendly art project for ages 6 or 7 up. Adia (age 8) calls this technique “Strawmania.” I call it dribble-and-blow. We set out to make some random scribbly looking painting/drawings that we would later turn into abstract detailed drawings or monster drawings.